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Paul McCartney, Mumford & Sons, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, Bjork, Wilco, Pretty Lights, Gov’t Mule, Jim James and More Confirmed for Bonnaroo

Mumford & Sons at Bonnaroo in 2011

Paul McCartney, Mumford & Sons, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, Björk, Wilco and Pretty Lights are among the acts slated to appear at the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival this spring. As previously reported, the 12th annual music, arts and comedy gathering will return to Manchester, Tenn. from June 13-16. The final Bonnaroo 2013 lineup will boast over 125 bands and more than 20 comedians on 13 stages. Other marquee acts slated to appear at this year’s festival include: Wu-Tang Clan, Daniel Tosh, The National, The Lumineers, David Byrne & St. Vincent, Passion Pit, The xx, Kendrick Lamar, Grizzly Bear, Animal Collective, Of Monsters and Men, Nas and ZZ Top. In perhaps this year’s most surprising move, ‘90s R &B star R. Kelly will make his first Bonnaroo appearance as part of a festival circuit blitz behind his new studio album Black Panties. The 12th annual festival’s lineup was revealed during an extended Lineup Announcement Megathon featuring “Weird Al” Yankovic and Portugal. The Man.

“When we go into programming the festival we say, ‘How can we build on the past of Bonnaroo but create something, fresh, exciting and engaging for the audience and ourselves,’” says Ashley Capps, whose Knoxville, Tenn.-based AC Entertainment produces the festival every summer with New York’s Superfly Presents. “There is a team that books and programs Bonnaroo and the one thing that can be said about all of us is that we are passionate music fans. We still pursue new music like any other fans, and I hope that the breadth and the depth of our lineup reflects that passion.”

Mumford & Sons and Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, two of this year’s headliners, have performed at Bonnaroo in the past. Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers—one of the first classic rock icons to headline Bonnaroo during its earlier years—performed at the festival in 2006. Their greatest hits-filled Friday night set included a guest appearance by Fleetwood Mac singer Stevie Nicks, who was on tour with Petty throughout that summer.

“Tom Petty’s musical legacy is amazing,” Capps says. “The extraordinary string of songs he has written and recorded over the years is part of the soundtrack of American music. That performance [in 2006] to this day is one of my favorite Bonnaroo performances of all time.”

Like Kings of Leon and My Morning Jacket before them, Mumford & Sons are among bands to grow from one of the festival’s intimate tent spots to a main stage headlining slot. The English roots-revival act performed in That Tent in 2010 and graduated to the Which Stage in 2011, where they drew the largest crowd in that stage’s history.

“As a music fan, it is always a thrill to see a band connect on such a deep level with their audience as Mumford & Sons has,” Capps says. “They progressed pretty quickly from the first year they played. That year we booked them as the first act of the day in a tent and, by the time we finalized the schedule, we had already moved them to the closing act in that tent. It was an explosive appearance and because of that we invited them back the following year. We could have put them on the main stage but they elected to play the second stage. It was one of the most iconic Bonnaroo performances from over the years. It gives you newfound faith in music to see a band like that achieve that level of success.”

Though this is Paul McCartney’s first performance in Manchester, the Beatle is no stranger to modern music festivals as in recent years he has performed at both Glastonbury and Coachella. His inaugural Bonnaroo appearance comes off his successful set at the 12.12.12 charity event, where McCartney performed with the surviving members of Nirvana.

“It’s a dream come true [to have Paul McCartney] and one that has been discussed for several years,” Capps gushes. “Sometimes it takes a while for the sun, the moon and the stars to align and this year they did. They haven’t shared too many details about his set with us but the one thing we can count on is that it will be an iconic performance. I saw him at Glastonbury in 2004 and it was inspirational. I still remember the day my father walked up to our back door with Meet the Beatles. I am sure a lot of the audience will never have seen him but will still know all the songs.”

As in years past, the festival will place an emphasis on special collaborations and jam sessions. Though many sit-ins will remain a surprise until show time, the festival’s signature SuperJam will return in an expanded format. This year the festival will host multiple SuperJams, two of which have already been confirmed.

The Soul SuperJam will feature Jim James with John Oates, Meters drummer Zigaboo Modeliste, Preservation Hall Jazz Band and other surprise guests while the Ed Helms Bluegrass Situation Superjam with weave in a variety of string players. Jim James has performed at Bonnaroo seven times in the past decade while Modeliste appeared at the festival in 2011 as part of The Original Meters’ reunion. Preservation Hall Jazz Band have appeared at Bonnaroo numerous times in a variety of capacities: They’ve hosted their own weekend-long stage, performed with Del McCoury, recorded Bonnaroo’s 10th anniversary theme song, hosted a film screening, sat in with My Morning Jacket on the massive What Stage and participated in a New Orleans-themed SuperJam featuring Dr. John and members of The Black Keys. This will be Oates’ first Bonnaroo appearance. (His longtime partner Daryl Hall played the festival in 2008 with Chromeo.)

“There is another SuperJam or two already in the works,” Capps hints. “The SuperJam is one of the special, iconic features of Bonnaroo—in some cases the ideas of the SuperJam take a while to come together and gel with the right plays. Having a SuperJam with Jim James is something that has been discussed for two or three years now and it is really exciting to see it come together.”

While primarily known as a comedic actor, Helms is an accomplished banjo player and pals with bands such as Mumford & Sons and Punch Brothers. Interestingly enough, Preservation Hall leader Ben Jaffe and Helms are old college friends and the tuba player will curate his own bluegrass tent at Bonnaroo this spring.

“Ed Helms is doing a tent called the Bluegrass Situation and it will culminate with a bluegrass jam that he is curating as well,” Capps says. “He first approached us as a bluegrass aficionado and banjo player. He hosted an event in Los Angeles called the Bluegrass Situation which is where the idea to have him do a tent emerged from a few months ago.”

One unexpected booking choice is English rocker Billy Idol, who is known for hits like “White Wedding,” “Rebel Yell” and “Eyes Without a Face.” Much like Alice Copper last year, Capps feels that Idol will appeal to Bonnaroo’s core audience. “We definitely have a bucket list of performers that we love that we think the Bonnaroo audience will love. It is part of the fun programming of the festival to surprise people a little bit and go out of the box a little bit but that people will still go nuts over.”

Bonnaroo’s early years primarily featured acts associated with jamband and Americana genres. This year the festival turns its attention to the modern psychedelic scene, which shares the festival’s roots in improvisational-inspired music. Some the style’s most prominent acts, including Animal Collective, Tame Impala, Lord Huron, Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti, Cults, Bombino, Django Django and Portugal. The Man, are slated to perform at the festival.

“Of the group of us who programs the festival, one of us is out seeing a concert every night,” Capps adds “When you see Animal Collective or Ariel Pink that is just as much about our passion as fans as it is about programming the festival.”

As of press time, Govt Mule is the only full-band only holdover from the first Bonnaroo on the festival’s bill. However, the Disco Biscuits’ Marc Brownstein and Aron Magner—who performed at the first Bonnaroo and have since returned several times—will perform with their Conspirator project.

Elsewhere, New Orleans jam/funk scene export Trombone Shorty will return to the festival, while banjo ace Noam Pikelny—who has performed at Bonnaroo as a member of both Leftover Salmon and Punch Brothers—will bring his Friends project to the festival. Jamband-inspired roots outfit Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers will also make their debut appearance at Bonnaroo.

“We are not consciously trying to not program [jamband music], but the process of booking the festival is an ongoing discussion,” Capps admits. “As we learn about which artists will be available at the time of the festival the lineup takes on a life of its own. We kind of follow that thread. We love a lot of the great jambands and they will definitely be returning to Bonnaroo at various points in the future.” Capps also admits that he didn’t notice the lack of a shed-size jamband until the festival’s lineup was revealed.

Another Bonnaroo regular who will return this spring is bluegrass legend Del McCoury. This year McCoury—who appeared at the first Bonnaroo with his family band—will perform with Bonnaroo veteran Sam Bush. Jazz/fusion icon John McLaughlin will also appear the festival with his project the 4th Dimension.

Bonnaroo has rounded out its rock acts with hip-hop and electronic music since its very first year. This year’s big name rap acts include Wu-Tang Clan, Kendrick Lamar and Nas, the latter of which has appeared at the festival alongside Damian Marley as well as a surprise guest during the Beastie Boy’s final live performance. Pretty Lights, Wolfgang Gartner, Porter Robinson and Paper Diamond represent a generation of electronic artists who made their name playing rock clubs instead of traditional dance halls. Pretty Lights has grown with the festival, too: In 2009, he played The Other Tent and this year he moves to the top of the event’s bill.

Capps promises a variety of lineup additions, including most of the comedy offerings and new additions to the festival site. In particular, he points to a new solar-powered grid that was installed since last June. He also makes a special mention of singer/songwriter Matthew E. White, who is billed near the bottom of the festival’s current lineup.

“Matthew is amazing—he played my friends’ festival Hopstock in September. The beauty of Bonnaroo is that you have Paul McCartney and Matthew E. White and so many points in-between.”

Tickets go on sale on Saturday, February 23rd at 12PM EST on Bonnaroo.com.

Here’s a look at the festival’s confirmed lineup

Paul McCartney
Mumford & Sons
Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers
Björk
Wilco
Pretty Lights
R. Kelly
Wu-Tang Clan
Daniel Tosh
The National
The Lumineers
David Byrne & St. Vincent
Passion Pit
The xx
Kendrick Lamar
Grizzly Bear
Animal Collective
Of Monsters and Men
Nas
ZZ Top
Beach House
Macklemore & Ryan Lewis
Cat Power
Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeroes
A$AP Rocky
Jim James
“Weird Al” Yankovic
Tame Impala
SUPERJAMS:
Soul SuperJam ft. Jim James with John Oates, Zigaboo Modeliste (of the Meters), Preservation Hall Jazz Band and more TBA!
Ed Helms Bluegrass Situation Superjam with special guests
Boys Noize
Glen Hansard
Gov’t Mule
Gaslight Anthem
Portugal. The Man
Wolfgang Gartner
Billy Idol
Sam Bush & Del McCoury
Dwight Yoakam
Foals
Porter Robinson
Local Natives
Matt & Kim
Dirty Projectors
Trombone Shorty
John McLaughlin and the 4th Dimension
Noam Pikelny & Friends
Amadou & Mariam
Alt-J
Father John Misty
Baroness
The Tallest Man On Earth
Walk The Moon
Preservation Hall Jazz Band
A-Trak
The Vaccines
Earl Sweatshirt
Paper Diamond
Holy Ghost!
Divine Fits
Mike Birbiglia
Purity Ring
Swans
Frank Turner
Big K.R.I.T.
Allen Stone
Cults
Lee Fields & The Expressions
Fatoumata Diawara
Two Gallants
The Sheepdogs
Four Tet
Calexico
Japandroids
Death Grips
Conspirator
Wild Nothing
AraabMUZIK
John Fullbright
Django Django
HAIM
Killer Mike
Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti
Action Bronson
Clockwork
twenty | one | pilots
Reptar
DIIV
Milo Greene
Lord Huron
Futurebirds
Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit
Charli XCX
JEFF The Brotherhood
Drew Holcomb and the Neighbors
Sea Wolf
JD McPherson
Trixie Whitley
Deap Vally
Patrick Watson
Nicki Bluhm & the Gramblers
The Stepkids
Aoife O’Donovan
Bombino
Bernhoft
Matthew E. White

Comments

There are 13 comments associated with this post

timmy February 19, 2013, 19:27:00

There’s always bands I would like to see, but I’m gonna have to sit this one out again. Already going to Wakarusa. That one, Suwanee, and Mountain Jam are way more up my alley. @twothousandtwo: I was there with you those first two golden years my friend. My, how times have changed, eh?

Eric February 20, 2013, 08:10:25

The “Sell Out Fest” looks lame this year. Guess they couldn’t get Justin Bieber to headline, maybe next year!

Eric February 20, 2013, 08:10:25

The “Sell Out Fest” looks lame this year. Guess they couldn’t get Justin Bieber to headline, maybe next year!

Eric February 20, 2013, 08:59:21

Looks like “Sell Out Fest” couldn’t get Justin Bieber to headline, maybe next year!

Snafunk February 19, 2013, 19:58:29

I didn’t know Coachella moved east

Jared February 19, 2013, 20:05:05

^wow compared to that, this years lineup is a complete joke (though its pretty much a joke anyway)

phesty phan February 19, 2013, 21:43:36

Ive been to many a festival including 4 bonnaroos. Cant do any of them do to work conflicts this year so screw em all. Bonnaroos line up is week this year. I think summer camp has the best one by far although late night bjork at bonnaroo sounds amazing.

timmy February 19, 2013, 19:32:06

R. Kelly and Billy Idol?????????

Two Thousand Two February 19, 2013, 17:53:08

Dirty Dozen Brass Band
DJ Logic
Les Claypool’s Flying Frog Brigade
Amon Tobin
Widespread Panic
Old Crow Medicine Show
Soulive
Gov’t Mule
Jim White
Umphrey’s McGee
Gran Torino
Keller Williams Incident
The Big Wu
Donna the Buffalo
Acoustic Syndicate
Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe
Blackalicious
Ben Harper
Cut Chemist
The String Cheese Incident
John Butler Trio
Jack Johnson
Jurassic 5
The Del McCoury Band
Drums & Tuba
Lil’ Rascals Brass Band
The Disco Biscuits
Galactic
Llama
Col. Bruce Hampton and The Codetalkers
Particle
Colonel Claypool’s Bucket of Bernie Brains
moe.
Ween
Vinroc
Phil Lesh and Friends with Bob Weir
DJ Z-Trip
Trey Anastasio
Corey Harris
North Mississippi Allstars
Béla Fleck and Edgar Meyer
Mofro
RANA
Gabe Dixon
Norah Jones
Robert Randolph and the Family Band
Campbell Brothers
Dottie Peoples
Blind Boys of Alabama

Tim February 20, 2013, 10:05:08

Lots of good bands, but not a very impressive lineup for a festival of this magnitude. Bonnaroo started as the premier jam influenced event and has slowly devolved into a hodgepodge of whoever is available. R Kelly? Weird Al? And what’s up with Tom Petty headlining all the festivals this year?? Also, I think everyone is just about done with Mumford & sons at this point.

Chris February 20, 2013, 12:52:35

It’s so sad that this is what Bonnaroo has turned into. Where are the musicians? Outside of just a few (i.e. Warren Haynes, Nels Cline, Mike Campbell, Billy Gibbons) there are no guitar players at this festival. The first two years of this festival had a vibe like nothing I’d ever seen. It was an amazing experience. The bands this year bring a different crowd with them that essentially changes the whole feel of this festival. At least we still have Wanee, Mountain Jam, All Good, etc. RIP Bonnaroo

kenny February 20, 2013, 13:24:01

I only went to the first one, and it was so great I told myself I would never go back so I wouldn’t “ruin” my memories. With each passing year I feel that much better about my choice – this festival looks nothing like what drew 80k curious people to a field in TN way back when.

timmy February 20, 2013, 13:30:51

Couldn’t agree with you more Chris. It has completely changed from a “jam” festival to a….whatever you call it now. Thank God for Wanee, Mountain Jam etc. They keep the grassroots feel to the scene, and bring in a crowd that is much more serious and dedicated live music fans than the majority of the Bonnaroo kids. I would much rather be around a generally older crowd, than a festival that is predominently 18-24. There is a massive difference in the vibe at a grassroots level production and a industry controlled festival.

dk70 March 1, 2013, 10:07:52

I miss “Drums and Tuba”.

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